Trigger Fingers Turn to Twitter Fingers

About a month ago rapper/actor Drake was dragged into beef between himself and rapper Meek Mill. Long story short, Drake came out the winner with two massive dis records, “Charged Up” and “Back to Back Freestyle” which turned into club smashes! One his big punch lines from his finishing record, “Back to Back Freestyle” was:

Yeah, trigger fingers turn to twitter fingers
Yeah, you gettin’ bodied by a singin’ n****
I’m not the type of n**** that’ll type to n****s
And shout-out to all my boss b****es wifin’ n****s

This line in particular was a strong dis and set the song on fire in the public eye. Blazing with popularity, you can still hear this song in the club and on the radio and everyone knows it. The dis is not the only thing that gave this song popularity however, the song gained popularity from the truth in Drake’s lyrics. Drake says, “trigger fingers turn to twitter fingers” and follows two lines later saying, “I’m not the type of n**** that’ll type to n****s”. What he is saying here is how the people nowadays are to scared to confront one another and turn to the internet as a form of vigilant protection, but he is not scared. This is very true. On the internet, anyone may say whatever they want and never reap any physical consequences. Why do we feel the need to do this however? Why speak outrageously on the web, then hold solemn in public? I offer there are two main reasons why we do this:

  1. The internet is convenient and vast.
    – Why would Meek Mill spend the money to fly from Philadelphia, PA to Toronto, CAN just to tell Drake what he thinks of him? What a waste of money and time when Meek Mill can simply tweet directly at Drake or sub tweet Drake. From there the fans and the world may blow up his words to a point where Drake may take notice and reply back. A war is started and Meek Mill did virtually no work at all, but 140 characters ~ 2 minutes of his time. In actuality, both Meek Mill and Drake probably gained a lot of notoriety due to this argument, which for an entertainer equals money.
  2. The repercussions are small.
    – Say Meek Mill does fly out to Toronto, CAN to tell Drake what he thinks of him. What if Drake doesn’t like Meek Mill’s tone of voice or word choice and the two break out in a fight at whatever public place they meet? First, this will most likely be recorded and posted to some form of social media instantly. Second, the cops will be called to arrest the two. Three, the two are arrested and both lose valuable time they could be making money or enjoying their freedoms. All this hassle is not worth it when Meek Mill could simply tweet or sub tweet Drake and get his point across, right? I mean Meek Mill can’t get in trouble because of a tweet since he is protected by the First Amendment. This is a false assumption that society makes often however. Caitlin Dewey of the Washington Post corrects this assumption saying, “The First Amendment defines the relationship between you, as a citizen, and the government. It does not define your relationship between, say, you and a private corporation, or you and the university you attend, or you and your neighborhood association.” So yes, at the worst Meek Mill could be suspended/expelled from Twitter for harsh words, but he cannot be sent to jail for his words and neither could you. You may however be monitored by big brother because of your words, as Twitter and other forms of social media most likely have a policy that requires them to report terrorist post and things of that matter to the government.

In closing, the better option that Meek Mill and society has that many seem to forget about is bravery. If you truly have an issue with someone or something, then go talk to them calmly and in a non-disrespectful manner or fix it. Respect goes a long way, but disrespect goes even farther.

How do you deal with issues on and off-line? Let me know in the comments below! Hope you enjoyed the piece!

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4 Comments

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  1. Wow! I didn’t think of that aspect of celebrity feuds. Honestly, I prefer handling confrontation off-line. You can see emotional ques and can most definitely walk away.

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  2. I believe that it is much better to do confrontations in person because it is more emotional and it will mean something. However, I do enjoy when people fight on twitter because I can see everything that they are saying and it is funny to watch. I do believe that it is a little cowardly to confront someone on-line rather than in person, however.

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  3. I agree that confrontations are much better handled off line, this may be because my intentions are never to negatively effect another person. If it comes down to the point that I don’t like what they are saying I just walk away. In following the #rosewda feed on twitter I came across the posting of an image in front of a cafe. It was a picture of a sign that said no WIFI so have a conversation. There is a lot of speculation that everything is moving online and this is just another piece of evidence in that direction. People just need to take the Twitter finger off the keyboard and enjoy what is around them.

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  4. Excellent post! I think you really identified the two main reasons for the controversies and arguments held on social media well. Whether they are celebrities or not, we see this kind of shit all the time. Similarly to how people gather around a fight or video tape violence in the physical world once the word gets out of a twitter war or Facebook argument we scroll through the comments and get the details. I am guilty of this for sure! LOL. But your point about the first amendment is accurate. We are not always held responsible for our actions within the digital world. The rights we have within the physical world do not transfer.

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